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June 26th     11:23 pm


Collection 02 (1994)Photography Wendelien Daan Concept Viktor & Rolf

Viktor and Rolf: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 by Artimo

Collection 02 (1994)
Photography Wendelien Daan Concept Viktor & Rolf

Viktor and Rolf: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 by Artimo

June 26th     10:36 am


Collection 02 (1994)Photography Wendelien Daan Concept Viktor & Rolf

Viktor and Rolf: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 by Artimo

Collection 02 (1994)
Photography Wendelien Daan Concept Viktor & Rolf

Viktor and Rolf: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 by Artimo

June 25th     11:03 am

L’Apparence du vide, Viktor & Rolf (October 1995)

L’Apparence du vide, Viktor & Rolf (October 1995)

June 25th     10:44 am


Collection 05 (1995)L’Apparence du videPhotography Viktor & Rolf Hair & Make-up Taco StuiverInstallation View Patricia Dorfmann Gallery Paris

Viktor and Rolf: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 by Artimo

Collection 05 (1995)
L’Apparence du vide
Photography Viktor & Rolf Hair & Make-up Taco Stuiver
Installation View Patricia Dorfmann Gallery Paris

Viktor and Rolf: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 by Artimo

June 25th     10:42 am


Collection 05 (1995)L’Apparence du videPhotography Viktor & Rolf Hair & Make-up Taco StuiverInstallation View Patricia Dorfmann Gallery Paris

Viktor and Rolf: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 by Artimo

Collection 05 (1995)
L’Apparence du vide
Photography Viktor & Rolf Hair & Make-up Taco Stuiver
Installation View Patricia Dorfmann Gallery Paris

Viktor and Rolf: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 by Artimo

June 25th     10:37 am

Collection 02 (1994)
Photography Wendelien Daan Concept Viktor & Rolf

Viktor and Rolf: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 by Artimo

(Source: cotonblanc)

June 25th     10:26 am


Viktor & Rolf: Le Parfum, 1996
It’s all about evoking that fashion dream, which they do partly out of a sense of nostalgia. The fashion world, with its big god-like couturiers who managed to dictate fashion for the entire globe, no longer exists, and that makes them sad. It also has to do in part with expressing their displeasure at the fashion world: why is it that a designer can only exist if he puts out his own perfume? This was why in 1994 the fledgling designers came up with their own fake perfume. But perhaps the most vital element in their flirting with the fashion dream is that they are revealing the borders of fashion system. Why does a show have to take place on a catwalk? Why can’t a musical serve as a platform for a show? Or why can’t there be dancing, as there was in the Flower show?
Knocking woman off her pedestal, José Teunissen

The Ideal Woman, published by SUN Publishers Amsterdam in cooperation with the ArtEZ Modelectoraat and kaAp, General Studies department, ArtEZ Institute of the Arts

Viktor & Rolf: Le Parfum, 1996

It’s all about evoking that fashion dream, which they do partly out of a sense of nostalgia. The fashion world, with its big god-like couturiers who managed to dictate fashion for the entire globe, no longer exists, and that makes them sad. It also has to do in part with expressing their displeasure at the fashion world: why is it that a designer can only exist if he puts out his own perfume? This was why in 1994 the fledgling designers came up with their own fake perfume. But perhaps the most vital element in their flirting with the fashion dream is that they are revealing the borders of fashion system. Why does a show have to take place on a catwalk? Why can’t a musical serve as a platform for a show? Or why can’t there be dancing, as there was in the Flower show?

Knocking woman off her pedestal, José Teunissen

The Ideal Woman, published by SUN Publishers Amsterdam in cooperation with the ArtEZ Modelectoraat and kaAp, General Studies department, ArtEZ Institute of the Arts

June 23rd     12:22 am

which proxy do you use, i’ve forgotten mine tbh

www.fromjapan.co.jp and don’t you just love/loathe the fair bidding system? extra 5 minutes whenever you’re no longer the highest bidder! 

June 20th     10:02 am


Junya Watanabe, Spring–Summer 2000
Putting design on the pedestalJunya Watanabe, protégé of Kawakubo, who presented his first collection in Paris in the early nineties, feels the same way: ‘I worked 365 days a year designing all kinds of commercial collections for Comme des Garçons. Sometimes, while I am working I stumble on a technical problem. That challenges me to make the next collection. I don’t trouble myself with female images.’ For him, too, the model is no more than a living mannequin. The design, the abstract idea, is what dominates, for which the woman is simply a signboard.
Knocking woman off her pedestal, José Teunissen

The Ideal Woman, published by SUN Publishers Amsterdam in cooperation with the ArtEZ Modelectoraat and kaAp, General Studies department, ArtEZ Institute of the Arts

Junya Watanabe, Spring–Summer 2000

Putting design on the pedestal
Junya Watanabe, protégé of Kawakubo, who presented his first collection in Paris in the early nineties, feels the same way: ‘I worked 365 days a year designing all kinds of commercial collections for Comme des Garçons. Sometimes, while I am working I stumble on a technical problem. That challenges me to make the next collection. I don’t trouble myself with female images.’ For him, too, the model is no more than a living mannequin. The design, the abstract idea, is what dominates, for which the woman is simply a signboard.

Knocking woman off her pedestal, José Teunissen

The Ideal Woman, published by SUN Publishers Amsterdam in cooperation with the ArtEZ Modelectoraat and kaAp, General Studies department, ArtEZ Institute of the Arts

June 19th     11:54 am

Kinship Journeys, Fall–Winter 2003–2004, Hussein Chalayan

June 19th     11:49 am


Kinship Journeys from Women by exhibition, Centraal Museum Utrecht 2003
Monuments for certain ideasValerie Steele talks to Hussein Chalayan
Valerie Steele: People who will visit the exhibition at the Centraal Museum might be taken aback by your presentation because it is not clothes.
Hussein Chalayan: Generally, the way I work is that I create monuments for certain ideas and then the clothes become an extension of those monuments. My interest wasn’t fashion to begin with. What I wanted to do was to incorporate different ideas en disciplines together and in the end to design clothes from them. At the museum you’ll be seeing three pieces that are all connected. One is a trampoline which you can jump up and down on, one is a confessional which you find in a church and the third object is a boat which is a coffin. The whole thing is called Kinship Journeys. They are about trying to reach the divine and the failure in trying to reach the divine. It is about how things can affect our lives: through the confessional in showing the ridiculousness of religion has oppressed certain groups of people. And it is about the idea of wanting to become part of the sea at death. The objects are connected in the way they represent the idea of wanting to become something else. Are sinners becoming fruits and flowers? Which is sort of a joke on the idea of sins.
These objects inform the fashion collection that you will see in Paris. They will be in the background and the Centraal Museum has made it possible for us to make them, which is amazing, because they are quite complex pieces and difficult to make. What I wanted to do was to show the objects here and write the instructions as how you would use them, so you could imagine how things can evolve from them, without seeing the final results.
Valerie Steele: The instruction, for example, next to the wooden trampoline says…
Hussein Chalayan: Attach balloons to your dress, or whatever you’re wearing and try to reach the clock that is constantly running. I suggest people to go and have a look at them, because it is very difficult to explain.

The Ideal Woman, published by SUN Publishers Amsterdam in cooperation with the ArtEZ Modelectoraat and kaAp, General Studies department, ArtEZ Institute of the Arts

Kinship Journeys from Women by exhibition, Centraal Museum Utrecht 2003

Monuments for certain ideas
Valerie Steele talks to Hussein Chalayan

Valerie Steele: People who will visit the exhibition at the Centraal Museum might be taken aback by your presentation because it is not clothes.

Hussein Chalayan: Generally, the way I work is that I create monuments for certain ideas and then the clothes become an extension of those monuments. My interest wasn’t fashion to begin with. What I wanted to do was to incorporate different ideas en disciplines together and in the end to design clothes from them. At the museum you’ll be seeing three pieces that are all connected. One is a trampoline which you can jump up and down on, one is a confessional which you find in a church and the third object is a boat which is a coffin. The whole thing is called Kinship Journeys. They are about trying to reach the divine and the failure in trying to reach the divine. It is about how things can affect our lives: through the confessional in showing the ridiculousness of religion has oppressed certain groups of people. And it is about the idea of wanting to become part of the sea at death. The objects are connected in the way they represent the idea of wanting to become something else. Are sinners becoming fruits and flowers? Which is sort of a joke on the idea of sins.

These objects inform the fashion collection that you will see in Paris. They will be in the background and the Centraal Museum has made it possible for us to make them, which is amazing, because they are quite complex pieces and difficult to make. What I wanted to do was to show the objects here and write the instructions as how you would use them, so you could imagine how things can evolve from them, without seeing the final results.

Valerie Steele: The instruction, for example, next to the wooden trampoline says…

Hussein Chalayan: Attach balloons to your dress, or whatever you’re wearing and try to reach the clock that is constantly running. I suggest people to go and have a look at them, because it is very difficult to explain.

The Ideal Woman, published by SUN Publishers Amsterdam in cooperation with the ArtEZ Modelectoraat and kaAp, General Studies department, ArtEZ Institute of the Arts

June 19th     11:08 am

Between, Spring–Summer 1998, Hussein Chalayan

June 19th     10:58 am


Hussein Chalayan, Between, Spring–Summer 1998
Clothing as a vehicle of ideas'I design as a way of dealing with themes from contemporary life. There are many themes to choose from, but the conditioning of human behaviour and the way it is culturally determined is what really interest me. How is a man supposed to behave? And a woman? You might call it an anthropological interest', says Hussein Chalayan.
The Turkish Cypriot designer finds the focus on the ideal female image and on sex appeal in fashion too limiting. He’d like to turn the spotlight on other dimensions of today’s culture, dimensions that lie right beneath the surface of fashion and daily life. One example is Between (Spring–Summer 1998), in which Chalayan brings the ambiguity of the ‘feminine’ gaze into sharp focus. He starts with a woman who is veiled from head to toe. With each consecutive model one layer of clothing is removed, until all that is left is a naked woman wearing nothing but a small mask over her eyes, as if an SM dominatrix has appeared. ‘The paradox of Islam is that it has women wearing veils to eliminate their beauty and sex appeal’, says Chalayan. ‘But the desire to remain anonymous and unseen has a boomerang effect. When you dress in a veil you become enormously conspicuous, especially in Western culture. And who controls the gaze? The Muslim woman peeping out from behind her veil, or the person who sees her?’ In Chalayan’s view, fashion is not only about clothing, but also about the real attitudes, poses and etiquette that exists in every culture. ‘Every culture has rules on the attitude we should adopt in particular situations. The way we open a present is culturally determined, but so is how we sit and stand.’
So for Chalayan, designing is a process of which clothing is only a part. ‘How can you turn an experience into something creative? That is what interests me, and in the end I use the body as a model.’
Knocking woman off her pedestal, José Teunissen

The Ideal Woman, published by SUN Publishers Amsterdam in cooperation with the ArtEZ Modelectoraat and kaAp, General Studies department, ArtEZ Institute of the Arts

Hussein Chalayan, Between, Spring–Summer 1998

Clothing as a vehicle of ideas
'I design as a way of dealing with themes from contemporary life. There are many themes to choose from, but the conditioning of human behaviour and the way it is culturally determined is what really interest me. How is a man supposed to behave? And a woman? You might call it an anthropological interest', says Hussein Chalayan.

The Turkish Cypriot designer finds the focus on the ideal female image and on sex appeal in fashion too limiting. He’d like to turn the spotlight on other dimensions of today’s culture, dimensions that lie right beneath the surface of fashion and daily life. One example is Between (Spring–Summer 1998), in which Chalayan brings the ambiguity of the ‘feminine’ gaze into sharp focus. He starts with a woman who is veiled from head to toe. With each consecutive model one layer of clothing is removed, until all that is left is a naked woman wearing nothing but a small mask over her eyes, as if an SM dominatrix has appeared. ‘The paradox of Islam is that it has women wearing veils to eliminate their beauty and sex appeal’, says Chalayan. ‘But the desire to remain anonymous and unseen has a boomerang effect. When you dress in a veil you become enormously conspicuous, especially in Western culture. And who controls the gaze? The Muslim woman peeping out from behind her veil, or the person who sees her?’ In Chalayan’s view, fashion is not only about clothing, but also about the real attitudes, poses and etiquette that exists in every culture. ‘Every culture has rules on the attitude we should adopt in particular situations. The way we open a present is culturally determined, but so is how we sit and stand.’

So for Chalayan, designing is a process of which clothing is only a part. ‘How can you turn an experience into something creative? That is what interests me, and in the end I use the body as a model.’

Knocking woman off her pedestal, José Teunissen

The Ideal Woman, published by SUN Publishers Amsterdam in cooperation with the ArtEZ Modelectoraat and kaAp, General Studies department, ArtEZ Institute of the Arts

June 18th     9:52 am


Black jacket, Martin Margiela
My name is Jenny. I’m a photographer. I grew up on a farm. I like boys and Martin Margiela. ❤ I got 41 42 pieces of it in 11 years. I took pictures of myself with my Martin Margiela.
JennyConcept, text and Photography Jennifer Tzar

BEople – a magazine about a certain Belgium, #03, Jun Jul Aug 2002

Black jacket, Martin Margiela

My name is Jenny. I’m a photographer. I grew up on a farm. I like boys and Martin Margiela. ❤ I got 41 42 pieces of it in 11 years. I took pictures of myself with my Martin Margiela.

Jenny
Concept, text and Photography Jennifer Tzar

BEople – a magazine about a certain Belgium, #03, Jun Jul Aug 2002

June 18th     9:48 am


Black glove shirt, Martin Margiela
My name is Jenny. I’m a photographer. I grew up on a farm. I like boys and Martin Margiela. ❤ I got 41 42 pieces of it in 11 years. I took pictures of myself with my Martin Margiela.
JennyConcept, text and Photography Jennifer Tzar

BEople – a magazine about a certain Belgium, #03, Jun Jul Aug 2002

Black glove shirt, Martin Margiela

My name is Jenny. I’m a photographer. I grew up on a farm. I like boys and Martin Margiela. ❤ I got 41 42 pieces of it in 11 years. I took pictures of myself with my Martin Margiela.

Jenny
Concept, text and Photography Jennifer Tzar

BEople – a magazine about a certain Belgium, #03, Jun Jul Aug 2002

s.t.