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February 13th     12:30 pm


Chinese Wedding Hat: Alexander McQueen Philip Treacy, Spring/Summer 2008

Philip Treacy by Kevin Davies, Phaidon

Chinese Wedding Hat: Alexander McQueen Philip Treacy, Spring/Summer 2008

Philip Treacy by Kevin Davies, Phaidon

December 19th     11:07 am


Katie Shillingford and Roe Ethridge for Dazed & Confused August 2010

Stylists: New Fashion Visionaries by Katie Baron, Laurence King Publishing

Katie Shillingford and Roe Ethridge for Dazed & Confused August 2010

Stylists: New Fashion Visionaries by Katie Baron, Laurence King Publishing

November 6th     9:41 am


Paris Collections Backstage Fall 2002, Alexander McQueen, V18Photography Nan Goldin
The artist Nan Goldin shot the scene backstage at the Paris collections, finding rare moments of intimacy and chaos.

V Best: Five Years of V Magazine by Norman Mailer, Edition 7L

Paris Collections Backstage Fall 2002, Alexander McQueen, V18
Photography Nan Goldin

The artist Nan Goldin shot the scene backstage at the Paris collections, finding rare moments of intimacy and chaos.

V Best: Five Years of V Magazine by Norman Mailer, Edition 7L

November 3rd     11:20 am


Quid Pro Quo: Marc Jacobs interviews Alexander McQueen, V3Photography Steven Klein Styling Victoria Bartlett Clothing Alexander McQueen Spring 2000

V Best: Five Years of V Magazine by Norman Mailer, Edition 7L

Quid Pro Quo: Marc Jacobs interviews Alexander McQueen, V3
Photography Steven Klein Styling Victoria Bartlett Clothing Alexander McQueen Spring 2000

V Best: Five Years of V Magazine by Norman Mailer, Edition 7L

September 29th     10:32 am


Alexander McQueen, What a Merry-Go-Round, Fall–Winter 2001–2002 

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

Alexander McQueen, What a Merry-Go-Round, Fall–Winter 2001–2002 

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

September 27th     11:34 pm


Alexander McQueen

Visionaries: Interviews with Fashion Designers, Susannah Frankel, V&A Publications, 2001

Alexander McQueen

Visionaries: Interviews with Fashion Designers, Susannah Frankel, V&A Publications, 2001

September 24th     11:23 am


Alexander McQueen
Backstage Photographs Anne DeniauAll clothes Alexander McQueen, Fall–Winter 2000–2001

Visionaries: Interviews with Fashion Designers, Susannah Frankel, V&A Publications, 2001

Alexander McQueen

Backstage Photographs Anne Deniau
All clothes Alexander McQueen, Fall–Winter 2000–2001

Visionaries: Interviews with Fashion Designers, Susannah Frankel, V&A Publications, 2001

September 24th     11:18 am


Alexander McQueen
Backstage Photographs Anne DeniauAll clothes Alexander McQueen, Fall–Winter 2000–2001

Visionaries: Interviews with Fashion Designers, Susannah Frankel, V&A Publications, 2001

Alexander McQueen

Backstage Photographs Anne Deniau
All clothes Alexander McQueen, Fall–Winter 2000–2001

Visionaries: Interviews with Fashion Designers, Susannah Frankel, V&A Publications, 2001

September 23rd     10:09 am


Phantasmic DialogueHaving once reversed the spectacle, McQueen effected a further reversal by turning the audience into voyeurs when the show started. The lighting went down on the audience and came on inside the box, which proved to be made of reflective surveillance glass, mirrored inside as well as out. This time the models inside the box could not see the audience but they could clearly see their own reflections. Thus the audience could watch the models watching themselves. For ten minutes the models preened, strutted and admired their own reflections, staging a solitary performance before the mirror that in real life would only occur in the privacy of the bedroom, but with the additional frisson that their simulation of solitary pleasure was performed, like a sex show, to an audience of fashion voyeurs concealed behind a one-way mirror.
Alexander McQueen, Voss, Spring–Summer 2001. Photograph Chris Moore, courtesy Alexander McQueen

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

Phantasmic Dialogue
Having once reversed the spectacle, McQueen effected a further reversal by turning the audience into voyeurs when the show started. The lighting went down on the audience and came on inside the box, which proved to be made of reflective surveillance glass, mirrored inside as well as out. This time the models inside the box could not see the audience but they could clearly see their own reflections. Thus the audience could watch the models watching themselves. For ten minutes the models preened, strutted and admired their own reflections, staging a solitary performance before the mirror that in real life would only occur in the privacy of the bedroom, but with the additional frisson that their simulation of solitary pleasure was performed, like a sex show, to an audience of fashion voyeurs concealed behind a one-way mirror.

Alexander McQueen, Voss, Spring–Summer 2001. Photograph Chris Moore, courtesy Alexander McQueen

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

September 20th     11:22 am


The Armoured BodyWhen Alexander McQueen drenched his models with ‘golden showers’ (actually water lit with yellow light) as they came down the catwalk, fashion exemplified the way that trauma was turned into a spectacle through the theatrical staging of transgression. In a show sponsored by American Express and art-directed by Simon Costin, McQueen harnessed the idea of the ‘money shot’ of pornography to fashion promotion; when American Express vetoed the show title Golden Showers he renamed it to Untitled, an ironic parody of art titles.
Alexander McQueen, Untitled, Spring–Summer 1998. Photograph Chris Moore, courtesy Alexander McQueen

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

The Armoured Body
When Alexander McQueen drenched his models with ‘golden showers’ (actually water lit with yellow light) as they came down the catwalk, fashion exemplified the way that trauma was turned into a spectacle through the theatrical staging of transgression. In a show sponsored by American Express and art-directed by Simon Costin, McQueen harnessed the idea of the ‘money shot’ of pornography to fashion promotion; when American Express vetoed the show title Golden Showers he renamed it to Untitled, an ironic parody of art titles.

Alexander McQueen, Untitled, Spring–Summer 1998. Photograph Chris Moore, courtesy Alexander McQueen

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

September 17th     10:57 am


CorporealityShaun Leane’s designs for McQueen’s Spring–Summer 1997 collection mirrored the elegant cruelty of McQueen’s razor-sharp cutting techniques, in a series of lethal-looking pieces that wrapped a single, long, silver, spike round the models’ heads in a range of ways. One circled around the model’s head like a halo; another wrapped round the front of the neck, its two sharply pointed ends streaming horizontally backwards from the model’s neck. Another pierced an ear, only to loop round to the front again, its two potentially fatal tips projecting far beyond the model’s cheeks and chin; a fourth snaked across the model’s face, slotting in and out of her mouth like a horses’ bit before curving upwards round her ears to project its long, shiny tips up and away from her temples like a fierce antennae.
Shaun Leane, sterling silver mouthpiece for Alexander McQueen, Spring–Summer 1997. Photograph courtesy Gavin Fernandes

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

Corporeality
Shaun Leane’s designs for McQueen’s Spring–Summer 1997 collection mirrored the elegant cruelty of McQueen’s razor-sharp cutting techniques, in a series of lethal-looking pieces that wrapped a single, long, silver, spike round the models’ heads in a range of ways. One circled around the model’s head like a halo; another wrapped round the front of the neck, its two sharply pointed ends streaming horizontally backwards from the model’s neck. Another pierced an ear, only to loop round to the front again, its two potentially fatal tips projecting far beyond the model’s cheeks and chin; a fourth snaked across the model’s face, slotting in and out of her mouth like a horses’ bit before curving upwards round her ears to project its long, shiny tips up and away from her temples like a fierce antennae.

Shaun Leane, sterling silver mouthpiece for Alexander McQueen, Spring–Summer 1997. Photograph courtesy Gavin Fernandes

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

September 17th     10:46 am


CorporealityHer ‘Knife Headpiece’ from this collection fitted the head like a conventional Alice band but extended around the ears, from where a series of metal ‘knives’ splayed out over the cheeks. Etched with delicate lace patterns and spread like a flirtatious fan against the face, the piece also suggested a lethal weapon that might whirr into life at any minute like Edward Scissorhands’ hands, and seemed dangerously unstable.
Sarah Harmanee, ‘Knife Headpiece’ for Alexander McQueen, Fall–Winter 1997–1998. Silver plated brass with photo-etched lace detail. Photograph courtesy Gavin Fernandes

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

Corporeality
Her ‘Knife Headpiece’ from this collection fitted the head like a conventional Alice band but extended around the ears, from where a series of metal ‘knives’ splayed out over the cheeks. Etched with delicate lace patterns and spread like a flirtatious fan against the face, the piece also suggested a lethal weapon that might whirr into life at any minute like Edward Scissorhands’ hands, and seemed dangerously unstable.

Sarah Harmanee, ‘Knife Headpiece’ for Alexander McQueen, Fall–Winter 1997–1998. Silver plated brass with photo-etched lace detail. Photograph courtesy Gavin Fernandes

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

September 17th     10:38 am


CorporealityFor McQueen’s Fall–Winter 1996–1997 show collection Leane made silver rose thorns which were stuck to the models’ faces and thorn necklaces and bracelets that spiralled up the model’s arm like rampant barbed wire. These pieces pinpointed what Derren Gilhooley has called ‘the inherent sexual violence’ of jewellery: ‘violence is implicit in jewellery’s very mechanisms of fastening, piercing, clasping and buckling’. It is these mechanisms that become the decorative motifs in Leane’s elegant, spiky and menacing jewellery for McQueen.
Shaun Leane, Thorn Arm Vine, solid silver, for Alexander McQueen, Fall–Winter 1996–1997. Photography Maya Kardun


Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

Corporeality
For McQueen’s Fall–Winter 1996–1997 show collection Leane made silver rose thorns which were stuck to the models’ faces and thorn necklaces and bracelets that spiralled up the model’s arm like rampant barbed wire. These pieces pinpointed what Derren Gilhooley has called ‘the inherent sexual violence’ of jewellery: ‘violence is implicit in jewellery’s very mechanisms of fastening, piercing, clasping and buckling’. It is these mechanisms that become the decorative motifs in Leane’s elegant, spiky and menacing jewellery for McQueen.

Shaun Leane, Thorn Arm Vine, solid silver, for Alexander McQueen, Fall–Winter 1996–1997. Photography Maya Kardun

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

September 17th     10:18 am


Alexander McQueen, No. 13, Spring–Summer 1999

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

Alexander McQueen, No. 13, Spring–Summer 1999

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

September 17th     10:10 am


Alexander McQueen, No. 13, Spring–Summer 1999

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

Alexander McQueen, No. 13, Spring–Summer 1999

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

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