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September 24th     11:55 am


Rei Kawakubo for Comme des Garçons
The Guardian Weekend, 1 March 1997Photography Jane McLeish-Kelsey Styling Rebecca LearyAll clothes Comme des Garçons, Spring–Summer 1997

Visionaries: Interviews with Fashion Designers, Susannah Frankel, V&A Publications, 2001

Rei Kawakubo for Comme des Garçons

The Guardian Weekend, 1 March 1997
Photography Jane McLeish-Kelsey Styling Rebecca Leary
All clothes Comme des Garçons, Spring–Summer 1997

Visionaries: Interviews with Fashion Designers, Susannah Frankel, V&A Publications, 2001

September 16th     11:46 am


Garments from Beyond Taboo, Fall–Winter 2001–2002, Comme des Garçons

Skin + Bones: Parallel Practices in Fashion and Architecture, MOCA

Garments from Beyond Taboo, Fall–Winter 2001–2002, Comme des Garçons

Skin + Bones: Parallel Practices in Fashion and Architecture, MOCA

September 16th     11:20 am


Garments from Hard and Forceful, Fall–Winter 2000–2001, Comme des Garçons

Skin + Bones: Parallel Practices in Fashion and Architecture, MOCA

Garments from Hard and Forceful, Fall–Winter 2000–2001, Comme des Garçons

Skin + Bones: Parallel Practices in Fashion and Architecture, MOCA

September 16th     11:10 am


Garments from Enforcement, Spring–Summer 2000, Comme des Garçons

Skin + Bones: Parallel Practices in Fashion and Architecture, MOCA

Garments from Enforcement, Spring–Summer 2000, Comme des Garçons

Skin + Bones: Parallel Practices in Fashion and Architecture, MOCA

September 16th     10:39 am


Garments from Clustering Beauty, Spring–Summer 1998, Audrey Tchekova for Comme des Garçons

Skin + Bones: Parallel Practices in Fashion and Architecture, MOCA

Garments from Clustering Beauty, Spring–Summer 1998, Audrey Tchekova for Comme des Garçons

Skin + Bones: Parallel Practices in Fashion and Architecture, MOCA

September 16th     10:33 am


Garments from Clustering Beauty, Spring–Summer 1998, Comme des Garçons
Since establishing Comme des Garçons in 1969, visionary designer Rei Kawakubo has consistently turned conventional notions of gender, beauty, and clothes-making upside down. Comme des Garçons’ first Paris presentation in 1981 was a collection compromising mostly shapeless, tattered black garments—a dramatic counterpoint to the conventionally tailored designs seen on 1980s runway. Kawakubo has continued to create iconoclastic pieces characterised by asymmetry, sculptural forms, and clever combinations of fabric layered, wrapped, or draped in unusual ways. While taking inspiration from a range of disparate and unconventional sources such as a frog, a starkly graphic drawing of a crow, and a crumpled pillow, her designs manage to retain elements of classical form, such as the shape of a bodice or the cut of a jacket.

Skin + Bones: Parallel Practices in Fashion and Architecture, MOCA

Garments from Clustering Beauty, Spring–Summer 1998, Comme des Garçons

Since establishing Comme des Garçons in 1969, visionary designer Rei Kawakubo has consistently turned conventional notions of gender, beauty, and clothes-making upside down. Comme des Garçons’ first Paris presentation in 1981 was a collection compromising mostly shapeless, tattered black garments—a dramatic counterpoint to the conventionally tailored designs seen on 1980s runway. Kawakubo has continued to create iconoclastic pieces characterised by asymmetry, sculptural forms, and clever combinations of fabric layered, wrapped, or draped in unusual ways. While taking inspiration from a range of disparate and unconventional sources such as a frog, a starkly graphic drawing of a crow, and a crumpled pillow, her designs manage to retain elements of classical form, such as the shape of a bodice or the cut of a jacket.

Skin + Bones: Parallel Practices in Fashion and Architecture, MOCA

September 13th     11:38 am


Telegrams from the FutureComme des Garçons Spring–Summer 1997 collection, called Dress becomes Body, consisted of long, fitted dresses in stretch fabrics, some in red, white or black, others in a range of ginghams: black, pale blue, pink or red and white. They were padded, with goose-down pads arrange asymmetrically to run over a shoulder, diagonally across a hip, down the back, or coil round the torso to form half-bustles, raised necks or prominent backs. The curator Richard Martin described the look of the 1997 Comme collection as one of ‘perturbed beauty’. The shop assistants at the Comme retail outlet in New York reputedly called them ‘tumor pieces’ between themeselves, while fashion journalists made Quasimodo references in articles called ’Like It or Lump It’ and ‘Padded Sell’. Yet in this collection, Kawakubo did seem able to rethink the body. If industrialisation inevitably produces a traumatised body, Kawakubo valiantly tried to re-see that body from another perspective, to invent it from scratch and to envisage multiple possibilities for such a body, fashioning fabulous creatures on the catwalk. ‘Creature’ and ‘creativity’ have the same etymological root; the Latin noun creatura, a creature, is ‘a thing created’. The padded design from this collection, each of which was a variation of a theme, could be seen as speculative prototypes, or an experiment in rethinking the human creature. Kawakubo, in her ‘thought laboratory’, set up this experiment by refashioning the relationship between subject and object, between dress and body and between human flesh and soft, goose-down pads. In these fabulous creatures the boundaries between body and dress were blurred, and subject and object, or self and other, were no longer posited as mutually exclusive terms.
Comme des Garçons, Dress becomes Body becomes Dress, Spring–Summer 1997, Photograph courtesy Comme des Garçons

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

Telegrams from the Future
Comme des Garçons Spring–Summer 1997 collection, called Dress becomes Body, consisted of long, fitted dresses in stretch fabrics, some in red, white or black, others in a range of ginghams: black, pale blue, pink or red and white. They were padded, with goose-down pads arrange asymmetrically to run over a shoulder, diagonally across a hip, down the back, or coil round the torso to form half-bustles, raised necks or prominent backs. The curator Richard Martin described the look of the 1997 Comme collection as one of ‘perturbed beauty’. The shop assistants at the Comme retail outlet in New York reputedly called them ‘tumor pieces’ between themeselves, while fashion journalists made Quasimodo references in articles called ’Like It or Lump It’ and ‘Padded Sell’. Yet in this collection, Kawakubo did seem able to rethink the body. If industrialisation inevitably produces a traumatised body, Kawakubo valiantly tried to re-see that body from another perspective, to invent it from scratch and to envisage multiple possibilities for such a body, fashioning fabulous creatures on the catwalk. ‘Creature’ and ‘creativity’ have the same etymological root; the Latin noun creatura, a creature, is ‘a thing created’. The padded design from this collection, each of which was a variation of a theme, could be seen as speculative prototypes, or an experiment in rethinking the human creature. Kawakubo, in her ‘thought laboratory’, set up this experiment by refashioning the relationship between subject and object, between dress and body and between human flesh and soft, goose-down pads. In these fabulous creatures the boundaries between body and dress were blurred, and subject and object, or self and other, were no longer posited as mutually exclusive terms.

Comme des Garçons, Dress becomes Body becomes Dress, Spring–Summer 1997, Photograph courtesy Comme des Garçons

Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness by Caroline Evans, Yale University Press

September 2nd     11:18 pm


Stephen Jones
Photography Justine Styling Geraida Kefford Make-up Nicole Jaritz Hair Fernando Torrent Model Saskia Slaaf
In a world where the most people wear on their heads is a pair of headphones, Stephen Jones is someone who has always understood the relevance of the hat. It’s a gift that’s widely appreciated. While Jones has been producing his own collections since 1980, one would be hard-pressed to come up with a designer with whom he hasn’t collaborated at some point in his career. There are the likely suspects such as John Galliano, Thierry Mugler, and the houses of Christian Dior and Givenchy, but also the completely unexpected—Comme des Garçons, say; or Jil Sander or Walter van Beirendonck’s W&LT line. Add to this his work with some of the more iconic pop stars of the last two decades (Madonna, Diana Ross, Grace Jones, Culture Club) and you’re looking at someone who has come a long way since the days when he thought he might never be able to make a living as a milliner. Jones fell into his craft after he graduated from Saint Martins in 1979. It was a time when fashion was more about personal expression than wearing the right labels. Jones himself was deeply into his Ludwig of Bavaria mode as created by Visconti. Jones had first-hand experience of the more experimental end of millinery, making hats for the Blitz nightclub habitués Boy George, Steve Strange, and Spandau Ballet, who also happened to be his roommates at the infamous Warren Street squat in London. (“We’d wake up in the morning,” Jones once said, “and the place would be surrounded by Japanese tourists.”) In 1980, he opened his first shop cum salon in the basement of PX, the boutique where the eccentric hat-wearing denizens of the aforementioned Blitz outfitted themselves. A collection for Jasper Conran in 1981 sent Jones off on one long and rollicking head trip. Before long the 80s (hats for the film Another Country, a one-man show at the New York night club The Palladium, more hats for Boy George) gave way to the 90s (a slew of fashion exhibitions worldwide, still more hats for Boy George). Jones has offered up both the sublime and the saleable  both serious couture quality and a near-surreal sense of humour—from fake zebra trilbies, feathered fedoras, and the fluttery confections that grace the ladies’ heads at Ascot and English weddings to the heady flights of fancy that come out of his numerous collaborations, including tropical palms, a black lace mantilla, and a jaunty pillbox hat made, perversely, from a rattlesnake’s skeleton.

Visionaire’s Fashion 2001: Designers of the New Avant-Garde by Stephen Gan

Stephen Jones

Photography Justine Styling Geraida Kefford Make-up Nicole Jaritz Hair Fernando Torrent Model Saskia Slaaf

In a world where the most people wear on their heads is a pair of headphones, Stephen Jones is someone who has always understood the relevance of the hat. It’s a gift that’s widely appreciated. While Jones has been producing his own collections since 1980, one would be hard-pressed to come up with a designer with whom he hasn’t collaborated at some point in his career. There are the likely suspects such as John Galliano, Thierry Mugler, and the houses of Christian Dior and Givenchy, but also the completely unexpected—Comme des Garçons, say; or Jil Sander or Walter van Beirendonck’s W&LT line. Add to this his work with some of the more iconic pop stars of the last two decades (Madonna, Diana Ross, Grace Jones, Culture Club) and you’re looking at someone who has come a long way since the days when he thought he might never be able to make a living as a milliner. Jones fell into his craft after he graduated from Saint Martins in 1979. It was a time when fashion was more about personal expression than wearing the right labels. Jones himself was deeply into his Ludwig of Bavaria mode as created by Visconti. Jones had first-hand experience of the more experimental end of millinery, making hats for the Blitz nightclub habitués Boy George, Steve Strange, and Spandau Ballet, who also happened to be his roommates at the infamous Warren Street squat in London. (“We’d wake up in the morning,” Jones once said, “and the place would be surrounded by Japanese tourists.”) In 1980, he opened his first shop cum salon in the basement of PX, the boutique where the eccentric hat-wearing denizens of the aforementioned Blitz outfitted themselves. A collection for Jasper Conran in 1981 sent Jones off on one long and rollicking head trip. Before long the 80s (hats for the film Another Country, a one-man show at the New York night club The Palladium, more hats for Boy George) gave way to the 90s (a slew of fashion exhibitions worldwide, still more hats for Boy George). Jones has offered up both the sublime and the saleable  both serious couture quality and a near-surreal sense of humour—from fake zebra trilbies, feathered fedoras, and the fluttery confections that grace the ladies’ heads at Ascot and English weddings to the heady flights of fancy that come out of his numerous collaborations, including tropical palms, a black lace mantilla, and a jaunty pillbox hat made, perversely, from a rattlesnake’s skeleton.

Visionaire’s Fashion 2001: Designers of the New Avant-Garde by Stephen Gan

August 29th     2:28 pm

Visionaire № 20, Comme des Garçons issue edited by Rei Kawakubo

(Source: ebay.com)

August 21st     12:13 am


Spring–Summer 1999, Comme des GarçonsOctober 1998, Paris

Paris Collection Individuals, 1998–––1999––– Nakako Hayashi, Little More

Spring–Summer 1999, Comme des Garçons
October 1998, Paris

Paris Collection Individuals, 1998–––1999––– Nakako Hayashi, Little More

August 20th     10:47 pm


Spring–Summer 1999, Comme des GarçonsOctober 1998, Paris

Paris Collection Individuals, 1998–––1999––– Nakako Hayashi, Little More

Spring–Summer 1999, Comme des Garçons
October 1998, Paris

Paris Collection Individuals, 1998–––1999––– Nakako Hayashi, Little More

August 20th     10:38 am


Fall–Winter 1998–1999, Comme des GarçonsMarch 1998, Paris

Stylists Voice: Nancy RohdeNR: Comme des Garçons has always been my most favourite. It’s always the best creations, I think. Such diverse ideas are put to making clothes, but one can always tell her clothe from others. Any designers would be fortunate if they can hold a show like hers once in their lives. But she is doing it every season, and it’s so great. As to this season, everyone was obsessed with the future in various ways. One good example is Andre Walker. Even Givenchy and Lacroix used hairstyles looked like Bladerunner. Kostas Murkudis used beautiful colours, yellow, red and gold. Martin Margiela had good clothes but his presentation was terrible. I want to see a show by him. I think that true avant garde is to surprise people by shows using models and music. 

Paris Collection Individuals, 1998–––1999––– Nakako Hayashi, Little More

Fall–Winter 1998–1999, Comme des Garçons
March 1998, Paris

Stylists Voice: Nancy Rohde
NR: Comme des Garçons has always been my most favourite. It’s always the best creations, I think. Such diverse ideas are put to making clothes, but one can always tell her clothe from others. Any designers would be fortunate if they can hold a show like hers once in their lives. But she is doing it every season, and it’s so great. As to this season, everyone was obsessed with the future in various ways. One good example is Andre Walker. Even Givenchy and Lacroix used hairstyles looked like Bladerunner. Kostas Murkudis used beautiful colours, yellow, red and gold. Martin Margiela had good clothes but his presentation was terrible. I want to see a show by him. I think that true avant garde is to surprise people by shows using models and music. 

Paris Collection Individuals, 1998–––1999––– Nakako Hayashi, Little More

August 28th     11:35 am


Sharon wears Comme des Garçons, Marie Claire Japanphotography paolo roversi hair julien d’ys stylist mako yamaz make-up jim beese

Fashion Images de Mode Nº2 (1997)

Sharon wears Comme des Garçons, Marie Claire Japan
photography paolo roversi hair julien d’ys stylist mako yamaz make-up jim beese

Fashion Images de Mode Nº2 (1997)

July 28th     1:17 am

Down-padding, Body Meets Dress, Dress Meets Body, Comme des Garçons, Summer 1997

Down-padding, Body Meets Dress, Dress Meets Body, Comme des Garçons, Summer 1997

May 5th     11:24 am



TWO WOMEN: REI KAWAKUBOComme des Garçons

Mode 2001 Landed-Geland, Flanders Fashion Institutecurator walter van beirendonck

TWO WOMEN: REI KAWAKUBO
Comme des Garçons

Mode 2001 Landed-Geland, Flanders Fashion Institute
curator walter van beirendonck

s.t.