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December 1st     11:55 am

Björk live at National Theatre, Reykjavík (1999)

November 4th     9:35 am


Jeremy Scott, SexPhotography Marcus Mäm Design Work In Progress

V Best: Five Years of V Magazine by Norman Mailer, Edition 7L

Jeremy Scott, Sex
Photography Marcus Mäm Design Work In Progress

V Best: Five Years of V Magazine by Norman Mailer, Edition 7L

November 1st     10:21 am


Jeremy: Nouveau Rich, V1Photography Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin
Jeremy Scott wears Gucci.
Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin’s first story for the magazine was a series of portraits of male fashion designers (Hedi Slimane, then designer for Yves Saint Laurent, is the only one wearing his own label).

V Best: Five Years of V Magazine by Norman Mailer, Edition 7L

Jeremy: Nouveau Rich, V1
Photography Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin

Jeremy Scott wears Gucci.

Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin’s first story for the magazine was a series of portraits of male fashion designers (Hedi Slimane, then designer for Yves Saint Laurent, is the only one wearing his own label).

V Best: Five Years of V Magazine by Norman Mailer, Edition 7L

September 23rd     10:24 am

Wendelien Daan

Wendelien Daan

September 18th     11:48 pm

Faye Wong in a leather top by Alessandro Dell’Acqua, gauze jacket by Jeremy Scott and make-up by Bless

Faye Wong in a leather top by Alessandro Dell’Acqua, gauze jacket by Jeremy Scott and make-up by Bless

(Source: wongfei)

August 29th     4:56 am


Jeremy Scott
Photography Marcus Mam
When the young Jeremy Scott visited Paris for the first time, he was, quite frankly, disappointed. Scott was literally fresh off the farm; his most formative fashion moment to date had been a cat fight on Dynasty (full hair, full make-up, gowns, jewels, the works); what’s more, he still believed in the glossy, glamorous magic of magazines like Vogue. So where were the ten-foot-tall glamazons in head-to-toe Thierry Mugler regalia? It has been Scott’s personal mission to bring the excitement and the glamour—and perhaps a little bit of humor—back to fashion. Jeremy Scott was born in 1973 in Missouri. He always wanted to be famous. Shortly after he graduated from high school, he entered a shoe design competition. He didn’t win, but he had discovered a passion and a potential claim to fame. He moved to New York and enrolled at Pratt. (F.I.T., legend has it, turned him down, saying that he lacked creativity and originality). Scott studied Balenciaga, Norel, Cardin. He got himself an internship with Marc Jacobs. And in the summer of 1995, he returned to Paris as a designer. Scott created his first collection with virtually no money; a series of surgically inspired pieces made from paper hospital gowns. Intricately cut and pleated, these frocks were in theory more decadent than any couture gown: they could be worn only once. He called them “prêt-à-jeter”. His first formal runway presentation he called Rich White Women: the all-white garments lacked sleeves or legs, or had humps or flying shoulders. This time, instead of paper or plastic, there was leather and fur. Scott, perceiving before him the leading edge of fashion that he had been searching for, was so moved by the sight of the models collected on the runway at the end that he cried out, “Vive l’avant-garde!” The phrase struck, and has now become his battle cry. The spring of 1999 brought the rosy Establishment: pink pouf dresses, pink bows, a pink poodle. Scott introduced himself to his audience in a voice-over: “Hi. I’m the designer. And I’m proud to be in the world of fashion.” This was the first time Scott used a real pant, with two legs. “I want to go down in history,” says Scott. “I want people to open books and see an outfit and say, ‘Oh my God, who made that? What year was that?’” The year is 2001. And the designer is Jeremy Scott.

Visionaire’s Fashion 2001: Designers of the New Avant-Garde by Stephen Gan

Jeremy Scott

Photography Marcus Mam

When the young Jeremy Scott visited Paris for the first time, he was, quite frankly, disappointed. Scott was literally fresh off the farm; his most formative fashion moment to date had been a cat fight on Dynasty (full hair, full make-up, gowns, jewels, the works); what’s more, he still believed in the glossy, glamorous magic of magazines like Vogue. So where were the ten-foot-tall glamazons in head-to-toe Thierry Mugler regalia? It has been Scott’s personal mission to bring the excitement and the glamour—and perhaps a little bit of humor—back to fashion. Jeremy Scott was born in 1973 in Missouri. He always wanted to be famous. Shortly after he graduated from high school, he entered a shoe design competition. He didn’t win, but he had discovered a passion and a potential claim to fame. He moved to New York and enrolled at Pratt. (F.I.T., legend has it, turned him down, saying that he lacked creativity and originality). Scott studied Balenciaga, Norel, Cardin. He got himself an internship with Marc Jacobs. And in the summer of 1995, he returned to Paris as a designer. Scott created his first collection with virtually no money; a series of surgically inspired pieces made from paper hospital gowns. Intricately cut and pleated, these frocks were in theory more decadent than any couture gown: they could be worn only once. He called them “prêt-à-jeter”. His first formal runway presentation he called Rich White Women: the all-white garments lacked sleeves or legs, or had humps or flying shoulders. This time, instead of paper or plastic, there was leather and fur. Scott, perceiving before him the leading edge of fashion that he had been searching for, was so moved by the sight of the models collected on the runway at the end that he cried out, “Vive l’avant-garde!” The phrase struck, and has now become his battle cry. The spring of 1999 brought the rosy Establishment: pink pouf dresses, pink bows, a pink poodle. Scott introduced himself to his audience in a voice-over: “Hi. I’m the designer. And I’m proud to be in the world of fashion.” This was the first time Scott used a real pant, with two legs. “I want to go down in history,” says Scott. “I want people to open books and see an outfit and say, ‘Oh my God, who made that? What year was that?’” The year is 2001. And the designer is Jeremy Scott.

Visionaire’s Fashion 2001: Designers of the New Avant-Garde by Stephen Gan

August 28th     11:46 am


Benoît Méléard
Photography Les Cyclopes Styling Benoît Méléard Make-up Topolino Hair Alexis Imaging Philippe and Christophe/Smith Model Debra Shaw
Benoît Méléard doesn’t like to use the word sexy to describe the shoes he makes. He prefers the word sex. Sexy is too gentile, he says. And Méléard is right. His shoes could make a stiletto blush. They are all sex and no innuendo. Many of his designs scarcely resemble shoes at all. They look like boxes or hooves, unforgiving architectural encasements for the foot. Some of his more shoelike designs titillate with a generous glimpse of décolletage. In other words, toe cleavage. “I am always working on the volume.” 
Méléard says. “Not to be vulgar, to be elegant. Strong but elegant.” Méléard thinks fashion is inherently cruel, and he may very well have been playing an eye for an eye when he created an extremely high shoe without a heel to stand on. “Everyone works on the shape of the heel,”he says. “I wanted to forget about it.” His Fall 1999 collection, in which this shoe made its debut, was called, innocently enough, “tip toe”. These heelless marvels came in any number of variations: one pair had metal and leather appendages like airplane wings; another was decorated with buttons (an homage to designer Patrick Kelly); another pair was bound together with a thick strap. Méléard has also created shoes from the hood of a sweatshirt affixed to a block of wood, and shoes with Rapunzel attachements of long silky hair, or spray of peacock feathers, or stiff side pieces that extend all the way to the shoulder, blurring the line between footwear and clothing. He likes to present these shoes with leotards, lots of leg make-up and the occasional mask. “I think you can wear them with what you want,” he says. “It’s not my problem.” Méléard, who has worked for both Robert Clergerie and Charles Jourdan, learned to make shoes at AFPIC, a small and exclusive Parisian school. He has won several prestigious awards and designers such as Jeremy Scott and Pascal Humbert have asked him to make shoes for their shows. In the fall of 1999, Méléard will test his commercial viability when he produces his first collection for the Spanish company Loewe. For now, his own shoes are produced by a Mr. Aris whose customer base, until Méléard came along, was mostly elderly women. (His previous cobbler didn’t work out because he refused to make the models he didn’t like, which amounted to a lot of them.) Mr. Aris finally decided that Méléard was not mad; he was an artist. Says Méléard, “I want Paris to become a city of shoes!”

Visionaire’s Fashion 2001: Designers of the New Avant-Garde by Stephen Gan

Benoît Méléard

Photography Les Cyclopes Styling Benoît Méléard Make-up Topolino Hair Alexis Imaging Philippe and Christophe/Smith Model Debra Shaw

Benoît Méléard doesn’t like to use the word sexy to describe the shoes he makes. He prefers the word sex. Sexy is too gentile, he says. And Méléard is right. His shoes could make a stiletto blush. They are all sex and no innuendo. Many of his designs scarcely resemble shoes at all. They look like boxes or hooves, unforgiving architectural encasements for the foot. Some of his more shoelike designs titillate with a generous glimpse of décolletage. In other words, toe cleavage. “I am always working on the volume.”

Méléard says. “Not to be vulgar, to be elegant. Strong but elegant.” Méléard thinks fashion is inherently cruel, and he may very well have been playing an eye for an eye when he created an extremely high shoe without a heel to stand on. “Everyone works on the shape of the heel,”he says. “I wanted to forget about it.” His Fall 1999 collection, in which this shoe made its debut, was called, innocently enough, “tip toe”. These heelless marvels came in any number of variations: one pair had metal and leather appendages like airplane wings; another was decorated with buttons (an homage to designer Patrick Kelly); another pair was bound together with a thick strap. Méléard has also created shoes from the hood of a sweatshirt affixed to a block of wood, and shoes with Rapunzel attachements of long silky hair, or spray of peacock feathers, or stiff side pieces that extend all the way to the shoulder, blurring the line between footwear and clothing. He likes to present these shoes with leotards, lots of leg make-up and the occasional mask. “I think you can wear them with what you want,” he says. “It’s not my problem.” Méléard, who has worked for both Robert Clergerie and Charles Jourdan, learned to make shoes at AFPIC, a small and exclusive Parisian school. He has won several prestigious awards and designers such as Jeremy Scott and Pascal Humbert have asked him to make shoes for their shows. In the fall of 1999, Méléard will test his commercial viability when he produces his first collection for the Spanish company Loewe. For now, his own shoes are produced by a Mr. Aris whose customer base, until Méléard came along, was mostly elderly women. (His previous cobbler didn’t work out because he refused to make the models he didn’t like, which amounted to a lot of them.) Mr. Aris finally decided that Méléard was not mad; he was an artist. Says Méléard, “I want Paris to become a city of shoes!”

Visionaire’s Fashion 2001: Designers of the New Avant-Garde by Stephen Gan

August 24th     2:48 pm

Spring–Summer 1999, Jeremy Scott

August 24th     2:46 pm

Fall–Winter 1998–1999, Jeremy Scott

August 24th     2:45 pm


Fall–Winter 1998–1999, Jeremy ScottMarch 1998, Paris

Paris Collection Individuals, 1998–––1999––– Nakako Hayashi, Little More

Fall–Winter 1998–1999, Jeremy Scott
March 1998, Paris

Paris Collection Individuals, 1998–––1999––– Nakako Hayashi, Little More

August 20th     10:25 am


Spring–Summer 1999, Jeremy ScottOctober 1998, Paris

Paris Collection Individuals, 1998–––1999––– Nakako Hayashi, Little More

Spring–Summer 1999, Jeremy Scott
October 1998, Paris

Paris Collection Individuals, 1998–––1999––– Nakako Hayashi, Little More

August 17th     2:01 pm

Faye Wong keeps her balance wearing a pair of sole-less heels by Jeremy Scott. Also as seen on Kylie Minogue.

Faye Wong keeps her balance wearing a pair of sole-less heels by Jeremy Scott. Also as seen on Kylie Minogue.

(Source: wongfei)

May 14th     10:23 am


An extraordinary personality, Jeremy Scott loves to bask in the heat of the spotlight and make use of his own public image. This native of Kansas City, Missouri, displays an unfaltering determination in the development of his fashion designs. After earning a diploma from the highly demanding Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, the fruit of four years of training in tailoring and pattern-making, he set forth to conquer Paris, a dream he had harboured since the age of fourteen.
Working on his own with the resources at hand, he organised his first fashion show, presented in October 1996 and featured ready-to-wear-couture cut from hospital sheets and crepe bandages. His second collection, “Body Modification”, in March 1997, flew in the face of prevailing trends with ultra-short body-hugging dresses in polyresin. With Scott, the origin of the materials is of no consequence as long as the design and the avant-garde approach shine through: scraps of black leather and garbage bags bedecked with silver zippers set a trashy-chic tone. Following along the same lines, his subsequent collections are all based around a single colour, making them easy to identify for a public that is eager to love or despise them. There is no middle ground with Jeremy Scott and his designs that combine the garish elegance of the nineteen-eighties’ total look with a taste for the unfinished and deconstructionism. His black collection was chosen for a “20/20 Vision Exhibition” in a Paris boutique in September 1997, as seen through the eyes of some twenty talented photographers including Mark Borthwick, Marcus Mam and Ali Madhavi.
In October 1997, the “Rich White Women” collection, devoted to white, took off from the encounter between ready-to-wear and couture, or “avant-garde luxury”. There followed the collection “Contrepied”, all in gold and winner of an ANDAM award, and the candy pink collection with its futuristic debutante gowns pierced with paper-punch holes. Scott’s is a truly spectacular style that pays homage to the unabashed elegance that is possible in the world of luxury and couture.

Black tulle jumpsuit decorated with glued-on black tubes, butterfly sleeves, bloomer legs.Jeremy Scott (1998)
ANDAM: La Mode Contemporaine, STEIDLtext florence müller photography ola bergengren styling mattias karlsson

An extraordinary personality, Jeremy Scott loves to bask in the heat of the spotlight and make use of his own public image. This native of Kansas City, Missouri, displays an unfaltering determination in the development of his fashion designs. After earning a diploma from the highly demanding Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, the fruit of four years of training in tailoring and pattern-making, he set forth to conquer Paris, a dream he had harboured since the age of fourteen.

Working on his own with the resources at hand, he organised his first fashion show, presented in October 1996 and featured ready-to-wear-couture cut from hospital sheets and crepe bandages. His second collection, “Body Modification”, in March 1997, flew in the face of prevailing trends with ultra-short body-hugging dresses in polyresin. With Scott, the origin of the materials is of no consequence as long as the design and the avant-garde approach shine through: scraps of black leather and garbage bags bedecked with silver zippers set a trashy-chic tone. Following along the same lines, his subsequent collections are all based around a single colour, making them easy to identify for a public that is eager to love or despise them. There is no middle ground with Jeremy Scott and his designs that combine the garish elegance of the nineteen-eighties’ total look with a taste for the unfinished and deconstructionism. His black collection was chosen for a “20/20 Vision Exhibition” in a Paris boutique in September 1997, as seen through the eyes of some twenty talented photographers including Mark Borthwick, Marcus Mam and Ali Madhavi.

In October 1997, the “Rich White Women” collection, devoted to white, took off from the encounter between ready-to-wear and couture, or “avant-garde luxury”. There followed the collection “Contrepied”, all in gold and winner of an ANDAM award, and the candy pink collection with its futuristic debutante gowns pierced with paper-punch holes. Scott’s is a truly spectacular style that pays homage to the unabashed elegance that is possible in the world of luxury and couture.

Black tulle jumpsuit decorated with glued-on black tubes, butterfly sleeves, bloomer legs.
Jeremy Scott (1998)

ANDAM: La Mode Contemporaine, STEIDL
text florence müller photography ola bergengren styling mattias karlsson

September 13th     10:32 am


Lida in Jeremy Scott, Stripphotography jerome esch styling elle hagen hair taco stuiver

Fashion Images de Mode Nº3 (1998)

Lida in Jeremy Scott, Strip
photography jerome esch styling elle hagen hair taco stuiver

Fashion Images de Mode Nº3 (1998)

August 29th     10:20 am


Red with Gemma Clarke, Vogue Parisphotography marcus mam stylist jeremy scott hair clovis make-up dalila

Fashion Images de Mode Nº4 (1999)

Red with Gemma Clarke, Vogue Paris
photography marcus mam stylist jeremy scott hair clovis make-up dalila

Fashion Images de Mode Nº4 (1999)

s.t.